Webinar #2

When: March 24th at 12pm Eastern Time.
Where: Here is the link when it’s live. No need to sign up. Just head here at 12pm on March 24th. (https://vimeo.com/399859713/c6575585ab)

First Webinar

The first webinar has been recorded. You can click here to watch it online or download it. (Download button to the bottom right of the video)

50 Comments

  1. David Scott

    When using the tools inside of Camera Raw, there is a “Color Box” at the bottom of the adjustment panel. Every time I select and use the “Gradient Tool” the overlay color matches the color shown in the color box. How do I disable that, or turn it back on? Is that associated with the “Range Mask” under it? And what about the 3 boxes at the bottom? Overlay / Mask / Clear All.
    And finally ( did you wonder if I would ever get to Finally? ) Can I add more than the 4 colors to the color box?
    Thanks Matt
    Dave

    Reply
  2. Dave

    Good morning Matt,
    This has been a really good educational time for many of us. I for one am starting to look at my images in a whole new way. When you share one of yours, I look at it and I think “Itโ€™s all about being in the right place at the right time”, what a great image. And then you start to make changes in a way that I never thought about before. Suddenly, the image you started with went from “Pretty Nice” to “WOW”. Yes, there is a question here, Iโ€™m just not sure how to express it.
    I like to think that Iโ€™m okay with composition, and I know how to adjust my setting. BUT!!!! How do I get my mind to “Imagine The WOW”. As I go back through my images, now that I am seeing what is possible, many of them are suddenly looking either flat or they need help with lighting. Is it all just a giant experiment until I suddenly become Amazing, or are there any “step by step guidelines” that I can ask myself as I review each image?
    Thanks Matt,
    Dave

    Reply
    • Matt Kloskowski

      Hi Dave. First off, thank you. Next, I think you’re on the right track. A HUGE part of this is just recognizing that there is something to do. After that, it becomes about practice. Trial and error… doing it over and over again. Some photos you’ll realize just won’t resonate no matter what. Others you’ll find have a transformation once you see a good editing path and vision. I know it doesn’t help much… but practice and trying different things will go a very long way. Hope that helps.

      Reply
  3. Ronald Whisenand

    Hi Matt:

    Looking forward to this week’s Webinar. A few questions in advance that I hope you can cover:

    1. Is there a way to adjust the brush size limits? I was practicing your vignette technique using blend modes and the eraser tool. While sing the bracket keys to increase the size of the elliptically shaped brush, there came a point where the ellipse went away and was replaced by the Photoshop cross. I should add that my image size imported into PS was 45 megapixels. I went to the Image menu and adjusted the image size down and tried again and was able to fill the screen with the ellipse. Is there a default setting that I can change so I can work with full resolution photos without sizing them down every time?

    2. In your Basic Luminosity Masking lesson, you say at the beginning that you recommend doing no or very little post processing in Lightroom at the beginning. I played with the technique (and also viewed your stand alone course on the subject) and ended up with darks and lights adjusted but the photo was still overly blah/muddy from a color/tone perspective. I can understand why you wouldn’t want to first adjust exposure, highlights, and shadows, but what about the other tonal adjustments that take a RAW image and give it the colors and tones your eye saw while taking the photo? Couldn’t you tweak white balance and the Presence sliders to get your tones correctly first then work the masking magic?

    Thanks,

    Ron

    Reply
    • Matt Kloskowski

      Hi Ronald – I can answer these pretty quickly.
      1) There is no way to adjust Brush size limits.
      2) I hope I said (and if I didn’t I’ll say it now) that there are no rules. Just guidelines. I would always adjust white balance first and even color. It won’t hurt. However, if you wanted to do it last it wouldn’t hurt either. So yes, you could do as you mentioned if it makes sense to you. I tried to say often during the course to “get away from absolutes”. To get away from the thinking that there MUST be one way to do things.
      It’s mood based, and if you’re in the mood or you get good results from trying any of those things you mentioned, go for it. Use your eyes as the final test and nothing else. If it looks good to you and you’re happy with it, that’s all the counts.
      Thanks.

      Reply
      • Ronald Whisenand

        Thanks Matt:

        Just to clarify on No. 1 – So you have had the brush circle/ellipse disappear when reaching a certain size. Mine disappears and is replaced by the PS cross at the 5000 pixel size limit. Just wanted to make sure I wasn’t crazy ๐Ÿ™‚

        Reply
        • Matt Kloskowski

          Hi Ronald. I’m not sure if it disappears or the edges simply go outside the boundaries of your screen. Remember, if you have a (big) 4K screen that’s only 4000 pixels. So how would you see a 5000 pixel brush?

          Reply
  4. larry simons

    Dear Matt,
    I subscribed to photoshop system 2020 in feb.however I have not been
    able to participate until now. Please inform me as to what to do next.
    Larry Simons

    Reply
    • Matt Kloskowski

      Hi Larry. You don’t have to do a thing. We’ll send out a message next week with the link for the next live webinar if you want to join in.

      Reply
  5. Michael Head

    Matt, I am having a really hard time trying to recreate the results you get with the quick selection tool.

    I am using a group photo that is well lit, sharp and contrasty. It is however “busy”. As I try to follow along the outline of the group the selection jumps all over. It does not matter whether I am approaching from inside or outside desired area. There does not seem to be a way to pull the selection lines where you want them to go. How do you fix a selection that is not quite correct? I have watched several times and I don’t see how to correct shown. This tool seems WAY less useful than the video led me to believe.

    I was able to get the selection using the magnetic lasso tool but it was beyond tedious.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Michael. Probably one of the reasons I get good results is just from experience of picking my battles. It needs a clean background. There’s really no tool out there that will automatically select something off of a busy background. If a person is wearing a dark shirt, and some one with a dark shirt, or a dark tree happens to be behind them, it’s never going to select them. If you look at the images I use it on (and the only images I’ll ever really try to replace a background with for that matter), they’re photos with a clear subject and a clear distinction between them and the background. If it’s not, I usually just don’t bother because I know it won’t be a success OR, I hunker down with brushes and other tools and have to spend as tedious of a time as you mention with it. But since I don’t get paid for my photography (only my education), I rarely do that since I’m my own customer ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
      • Michael Head

        Thanks very much.

        Assuming you get a useful subject selection with just a few problems is there a way to fix the selection? I have tried adding to a selection and that works. However I have never been able to remove part of a selection using a tool in MINUS mode. It seems to be a weak spot in the selection tools. It is possible that I don’t know enough to know where that fix exists.

        I am pretty much back to where I started. Unable to make really usable selections beyond lassoing a distraaction for removal.

        Reply
  6. Ed Miller

    Suggestion: For the next and future webinars, play some music or other audio file when you put up the opening page. It will allow the viewer to adjust their audio level and eliminate questions about no audio. In the first “Office Hours” there was silence for 5 minutes which caused me to wonder if there was an audio problem on the saved/downloaded version. I figured it out after skipping ahead in the webinar.

    Thanks for the excellent information.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Ed. That’s why I added the “Chapters” and the first chapter actually says “Skip all the intro stuff”. I’ll have a “Starting Soon” screen up next time though.

      Reply
  7. Caryl Sedushak

    Thanks for all the great information, Matt!
    I’d be interested in learning about the free items Adobe offers.

    Reply
  8. Allen Tucker

    Thanks for the information on enlarging images. Do you have any tips for “ensmalling” to notecard size the huge files produced by modern cameras?

    Reply
    • Matt Kloskowski

      Hi. Just go to Image > Image Size and make it smaller. No tips needed.

      Reply
  9. gisela.schroeder@gmail.com

    It is 12:01 eastern time and no sign of a webinar. Am I in the wrong time zone?

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi. It was listed on this page. The replay is available on here now. Thanks.

      Reply
  10. Neal Abello

    I have a basic question regarding cropping. If I crop an image to get more of the subject closer, eg. a whale breaching, and I want the same size for printing, it seems that the resolution degrades because of fewer pixels. I tried this to get an image of a decent size and set it up to send to Printique and got the message that is was of low quality. Would changing the photo to a Smart Object keep the resolution no matter the size or is there another way to crop for a closer subject while keeping the resolution the same. Does this question make sense? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Neal. This is answered in the video.

      Reply
  11. Dany Nakhoul

    Hi, I’m currently in the early stages of the Photoshop course. I use Lightroom CC, and sometimes have difficulties moving photos or stacks to Photoshop. One of the issues I often face is when I move a photo over to PS, I lose the edits done in Lightroom. Perhaps it is because the file hasn’t saved yet to the cloud but not sure. Also, I can’t figure out how to edit multiple photos as a stack in PS (starting from LR). I do have LR Classic which works better with Photoshop, but I am more comfortable using LR CC and LR Mobile. thanks!

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Dany – this one was answered in the video.

      Reply
  12. Ronald Whisenand

    Hi Matt:

    First let me say that the Lightroom and Photoshop courses are excellent. While I’ve used both programs in the past, I feel I’m learning how to better use the tools. I appreciate your approach of explaining why use a feature (and why not) as well as the how to. I have gotten through most of the Lightroom program and have a few questions (hope to get through Photoshop by your next webinar):

    1. You mention early on that you would not recommend using more than one Catalog. My wife will take her camera on trips and I’ve used the dual catalog to keep our photos separate and easier for her to navigate without wading through all my pics. I know there are a few steps I must take to switch between our catalogs. Is there a reason why I should consolidate (i.e. am I at a risk of loosing photos with more than one catalog?). Is there a better way?

    2. I liked the “plug-in extras” feature you mentioned to import camera photos (my old way involved many steps of imports/exports/etc). Is there a way to use the “extras” feature to import only selected photos rather than everything on my phone? I have hundreds of non-photographic worthy shots on the phone that I wouldn’t really need to import into Lightroom.

    3. Would love to have a good explanation of presets vs. profiles – why and when to use them. I’ve used profiles after some post-processing but never presets as my first step. By the way I use your’s and Lightroom’s profiles often, especially when converting to B&W.

    Thanks again

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Ronald. This was office hours for the Photoshop System, not Lightroom. I can answer really quick though:
      1) If two of you are using the same computer, that is about the only reason I’d suggest multiple catalogs.
      2) No there isn’t.
      3) Do a google search for “MattK.com & presets vs profiles”. I did a video on it ๐Ÿ™‚
      THanks!

      Reply
  13. Marilyn in NC

    I was confused by my first viewing of your lesson (2.1), and not much better after the second round. You have PS set to a default color space of sRGB which will handle anything that comes its way. If you send a photo over from LR, you set that to ProPhoto and then set PS so that it will use that profile. Is there a reason you don’t set the default space in PS to ProPhoto with the same action to use whatever profile might come in on a file, such as a JPG file that was created with sRGB? It just seems more intuitive to me to tell PS to use ProPhoto unless for some reason it can’t, like the stray photo from somewhere other than LR.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi. I personally create images all the time in Photoshop (File > New). Any time I do this it’s purely for the screen. I never create an image from scratch that I’m going to print. If I print, it starts as a photo. So (for me), leaving it to sRGB (which is the space I would want that image in anyway) is just easier. Whichever way works for you. In the end, the color spaces matter very little, and most of us mere mortals with mere mortal eyes will never see the change ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  14. Dave Scott

    Good morning Matt,
    I am a self taught Photoshop user, starting with PS7. I have learned a lot since then, but as you can imagine, I am missing a lot. I purchased your new PS 2020 and it is perfect for me. I am learning a lot and confirming a lot as well.
    I shoot everything in raw and edit in raw. I use the PS tools for the fun things just as you have suggested. So, here is my question: I use “Bridge” for my image folders. Lightroom wasnโ€™t around back then. When LR came out, it seemed to be just another way to store files. Then the Raw tools were introduced, but I already had them with PS. Should I force myself to move into Lightroom? Or is the Folder system in Bridge, Combined with the PS Raw editor better to stick with?

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Dave. This was answered in the video.

      Reply
  15. Rick Malamed

    Hi Matt, I was on vacation in England last summer. We visited a castle and I took pictures inside but was not allowed to use a flash. Some of the areas were quite dark, so I set my Canon to camera raw, 1/60th of a second, f 4.0 and I let the camera select the ISO. In this case it was 10,000. I can’t seem to get a good white balance with the Camera Raw Filter in PS or the Develop module in LR Classic. Do you have any suggestions for getting a good white balance in PS (or LR Classic)? I can send you the picture, if you like.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Rick. I answered this one in the video.

      Reply
  16. cstevens3

    At the end of Lesson 8, you say the next lesson will continue the discussion of resizing — for when you want a specific size or resolution. But the next lesson is Brushing. Is the resizing discussion continued later in the series?

    Like the program so far. Very clear. Thanks!

    Reply
  17. Richard Budde

    Recent purchaser of your Photoshop Systemโ€ฆ long time Lightroom user; first time Photoshop user.
    In your videos, you emphasize that not all of the features in Photoshop are going to be useful to photographers. I am wondering if there is some way within the Photoshop program to turn off (ala Solo mode in Lightroom) tools, menu items, etc. to just present in the user interface those items pertinent to photographers.

    I understand that there is a concept called Workspaces and have selected the Photography option. At a cursory glance, this does not seem to remove tools and menu items from the user interface.

    I assume that the Workspace is saved as a file that is referred to each time the Photoshop program is started. If so, have you created a Workspace that is tailored for beginning photographers just starting out with Photoshop? If so, would you be willing to share said file?

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Richard. Check out the section and videos on “Interface” in the Photoshop System. It talks about the toolbar, menus etc… and how you can hide just about anything you want. You won’t find an “official” workspace or feature for it because I can guarantee you the moment me or anyone else, labels a feature as totally useless for photography, some one will find a video or a tutorial that uses that feature and then wonders where it is because it’s hidden in their Photoshop. That’s the beauty of Photoshop. For every feature I (or anyone) deem unworthy for photography, there’s always a “catch” (though I don’t think you’ll ever hear me sing the praises of the “Count Tool”) ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
  18. eefms.rg

    1.LR keeps a history of every step taken in Develop, which makes it possible to back to any given point and rework from there. Does PS have a corresponding feature?
    2. Is it possible to come out of PS with an edited image that is still dng/raw? I think I read that tiff, the usual format coming out of PS, doesn’t have a very wide latitude for additional changes in LR.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi…
      1) No
      2) No there is no way. And I would disagree with the statement that TIFF doesn’t allow a wide latitude for changes. Remember the workflow I suggested as well. All of your “BIG” exposure and color moves should be done on the raw file before Photoshop. Micro-adjustments to the TIFF afterward are totally fine – and even some bigger changes are fine too. But the proof is in your photos. Save a TIFF and edit it in Lightroom after and see for yourself? Does it degrade or does it look and print just fine? (it will by the way). Remember, reading about stuff and conceptualizing is good… practicing that stuff you read about and seeing for yourself is even better ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  19. Lola Laird

    I’m just getting started with PS, although I’ve been using LR5 for a while and just upgraded to the subscription. This is probably a very basic question, but here goes. When I’ve been using LR and PS for editing and quit and close the program then decide soon after to go back in to do something else, I get this warning: The LR catalog named “Lightroom Catalog” cannot be opened because another application already has it opened.
    The only way I have found to close that catalog is to close down my whole computer. Is there something I’m missing or doing wrong?
    Thanks so much.

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi Lola. are you sure you have all previous versions of Lightroom closed? It may be a good idea to uninstall them too.

      Reply
  20. Wim Jacobs

    Hi Matt,

    I have a question related to aligning layers in Photoshop.

    There’s this technique I started using a lot for static high ISO night scenes, of which I would take a dozen or two near identical hand held shots. After basic adjustments in LR, I open the images as layers in PS, align them, convert into smart object and then select the average blend mode. This miraculously gets rid of any noise. Nothing new there.

    When I want to include a starry sky however, obviously the stars move slightly between shots (well actually it’s the earth, but well… ๐Ÿ™‚ ). Photoshop tends to pick up on the landscape and align that. The blending results in streaked stars. I’ve seen tutorials suggesting masking out the foreground, only leaving the sky visible, and having Photoshop align that. However, this never seems to work for me. Perhaps there’s faint clouds or other nuances in the sky that I don’t see myself, but that Photoshop considers more relevant than the stars, which it considers just noise (because I *am* using noisy images)? I’ve resorted using PT GUI Pro that I use for complicated stitching, and that allows me to manually set specific control points on all images for stitching. Time consuming but it delivers… PT GUI Pro outputs a PSD file that I take back into Photoshop to continue with the smart object and blending, and from there it’s sky replacement…

    Any idea what could help me avoid having to take the detour in PT GUI Pro?

    Thanks in advance!! Wim

    PS: Tx for doing this course the way you do, focusing on tools for photographers! I hesitated a long time before getting it, already knowing and using Photoshop for over a decade. But even the first basic lessons taught me a few things I never knew. Super!!
    PS2: The only thing that keeps me struggling is missing some of the non-letter shortcuts. I live in one of those places (Belgium) where we don’t use QWERTY keyboards, so shortcuts like [ and ] don’t seem to work on our AZERTY keyboard. If you know of any way to fix that, I would love to know…

    Reply
    • Wim Jacobs

      Hi Matt,

      Quick update on my questions.

      1) Aligning the stars: I tried some more specialized software in the mean time (Sequator), and… it couldn’t align my images either. If that software doesn’t cope, I guess I shouldn’t expect Photoshop to be able to either. Probably my images are simply too noisy and the stars too faint… So I’m down to PT Gui Pro again (fortunately that works).

      2) AZERTY keyboard shortcuts: I decided to purchase a QWERTY keyboard that I will use when working in Photoshop instead of my default keyboard. Got one with Photoshop shortcuts printed on the keys. That should make it easier to get the most out of your course.

      All the best!

      Reply
  21. David Tillett

    Thanks for the course Matt, it is helped me cut through all the options in PS to get to the ones that I need for photography.

    One query I have is linked to your comments about doing as much as possible in RAW converter as more information is available there. LR, On1 etc can handle other formats than RAW, including TIFF/PSD which have 16 bit RGB values for each pixel as opposed to 12/14 bit single colour (R, G or B) values for each RAW pixel, with the raw converter calculating the RGB values based on the pixel and its neighbours.

    So when you say that more data is available when using a RAW file in LR etc does this mean that changing settings such as exposure, highlights, shadows etc forces a recalculation of the pixel values rather than performing the adjustments on the result of the initial conversion?

    If the recalculation does not take place isn’t that the same as working on a 16-bit TIFF/PSD file that has already been converted?

    Reply
    • Matt

      Hi David. I honestly don’t know how to answer that. I don’t know what calculations are being made where and what RGB conversions are being made. What I do know is that you’ll get better results in a raw editor by working on a raw photo. Whether it’s ON1 or Adobe. Just like ON1, your an open a PSD or JPG or TIFF file in LR/ACR and edit the file there too. But you have access to less information than you do with the raw file. Hope that helps.

      Reply
    • Michael Head

      David, You are over thinking this. In LR other than the preview on your screen Pixels never get created. That only happens when send the file somewhere. For instance, creating a jpg, printing, sending a file to PS. Prior to that, no pixel based file is created. So,Yes LR recalculates from the raw data every time you make a change.

      Reply
  22. Jim Lassoie

    MattK
    I have moved mostly to ON1 2020 (from LR) but often find myself in and out of PS 2020 for some editing…hence, the course as a refresher (plus I really like your training style). I’ve also found this to be especially critical because ON1’s new print mod has problems/limitations…so, I might edit and proof in ON1 and move over to PS for any tweaks and to print. Of course this is far from ‘seamless’ like between LR & PS. Might be too big a question for this forum but any suggestions for work flow and potential problems? I generally Export a psd file to my desk top and open it in PS for editing and printing.
    Thanks
    Jim

    Reply
    • David Tillett

      Why not use On1’s Send To option from Browse module? If send a copy with ON1 adjustments then On1 will create a file (PSD, TIFF etc can be selected) and open this in Photoshop. Close the file after making adjustments and the modified file will appear in On1, just check that sorting by File Name to ensure located next to original. Only difference I can see from LR/PS workflow is that On1 doesn’t support stacking of images.

      Reply
      • Jim Lassoie

        Now there’s an obvious approach that has escaped me …I tend to get stuck on not using pull-downs and and miss a lot not with the sliders
        TX

        Reply
      • Matt

        I guess my big question is… why not just use Lightroom. You’re definitely advanced if you’re using Photoshop, so LR shouldn’t be a problem. Just keep it in the family and things will be easier and you won’t have all of those .ON1 files floating around.

        Reply
        • Jim Lassoie

          Good point Matt. But I don’t often post to ‘straight’ (i.e., ‘perfect’) images and have grown to like the easy of Effects, presets, layering textures, etc. in ON1. PS has Plus, you’ve don’t some helpful trainings! (<:

          PS: I have your LR course and recent update so maybe I'll play around to see if I can get the same results out of it.

          Reply
  23. Larry Stickland Stickland

    I have a question about cropping in both Lightroom and Photoshop and I am not sure how to ask this. Does cropping reduce the number of pixels in the photo and does this affect the size that the photo can be printed?

    Reply
    • Ed Miller

      Any cropping program you use should produce the same results.

      In the cropped area you will have the same number of pixels per inch. The actual number of pixels in the cropped picture will be less because the total picture area has been reduced by cropping.

      For example: If your picture is 2000×1000 pixels the total pixel count for the picture is 2,000,000; assume the picture is 20×10 inches, that is 200 square inches or 10,000 pixels per square inch. When you crop a picture it will keep the 10,000 pixels per square inch, but the total number of pixels in the file will be reduced by the size of the final crop: i.e. if you change the size to 10×10 inches you will have 1,000,000 pixels (100 sq in x 10,000 pixels) in the cropped photograph file. A 4×5 final crop of the original image would be 20 sq in or 200,000 pixels.

      Note: increasing the size of a cropped image lowers the pixels per inch. going from 4×5 to 10×10, you are stretching the 200,000 pixels to fit a 100 sq in area, so you end of with only 2,000 pixels per inch. Some resize programs can help enlarge the file, but they have to interpret (resample) the original pixels to adjust the size.

      Reply

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